burn fire dry leaf in garden

Due to the persistent drought conditions in Middle Tennessee, Brentwood Fire officials have suspended the issuance of burn permits for open burning until the area receives measurable rainfall. 

Brentwood Fire and Rescue Deputy Chief Brian Collins said, “the prolonged dry weather, combined with windy conditions means that permit-required open burning cannot be conducted safely. Until further notice, we cannot safely allow open burning in Brentwood.”

Commercial businesses which use air curtain destructors under supervised, controlled environments are exempt from the ban. Brentwood Fire officials will continue to monitor conditions and notify residents and businesses when the ban on burning is lifted.

Personal Fireworks Aren’t Allowed in Neighborhoods

As the city approaches the July 4th holiday, Brentwood government issued a reminder to residents that personal firework displays are illegal inside the City of Brentwood without a permit. 

Brentwood Fire Marshal Chief Jeff Pender said, “this is something that has been part of the municipal code for many years. In this current drought and extreme heat conditions, even a small firework could ignite a large fire.”

The city asks that all residents be respectful of their neighbors and allow the only fireworks set off to be those in permitted displays.

The Brentwood Municipal Code defines fireworks as any combustible or explosive device, or article prepared for the purpose of producing a visible or audible effect by combustion, explosion, deflagration or detonation.

Examples include, but are not limited to, firecrackers, torpedoes, skyrockets, Roman candles, bottle rockets, sparklers, smoke bombs and other fireworks of like construction and any fireworks containing any explosive or flammable compound. Flammable “sky lanterns” are also prohibited per state law enacted in 2011. 

Concerns about violations can be reported to the Brentwood Police at the non-emergency line only, at 615-371-0160.