Spring Hill Water Treatment Plant

Spring Hill's water treatment plant on Kedron Road.

Spring Hill Mayor Jim Hagaman Wednesday detailed actions the city is taking to maintain ample water reserves for everyday uses plus necessary reserves for fire suppression scenarios, per a release from the city. 

Mayor Hagaman also signed an emergency declaration that requires nonessential water uses to be curtailed for no more than seven days, to enable the city to replenish its peak-season water reserves. Hagaman and Spring Hill’s City Administrator Pam Caskie posted a related briefing on water issues on the city’s website on Wednesday.

Despite existing water policy that asks residents to water lawns on particular days and not on Fridays, usage shot up precipitously in recent weeks. It takes 40 percent of reserves for the Fire Department to address multiple fire scenarios simultaneously. Levels dropped below 40 percent this week.

Aggravating the situation is the lack of critical components for a new water booster station near Spring Hill High School because of national supply chain delays, says the release. 

That facility was to have been in operation already, and it may be online in July. Nonessential uses in the mayor’s declaration include irrigation of grass, car washing and filling of swimming pools. They do not include new landscaping, vegetable gardens or domestic use. Water deployed during fire suppression can depressurize the entire system unless adequate water resides in city tanks to maintain water pressure.

The booster station that is about to come on line, plus additional tank storage, will help address this challenge.