Transylvania Regional Hospital

Two board members for a hospital within the Mission Health system bought by HCA Healthcare in 2019 have resigned from its board of trustees, citing “disappointment” in the Nashville-based health giant’s leadership.

Parker Platt, a prominent local architect, and Mark Weinstein, president and CEO of a local music training program, announced their resignation from the board of Transylvania Regional Hospital in North Carolina via an Op-Ed in The Transylvania Times earlier this week.

Their departures come amid ongoing resistance to HCA’s $1.5 billion takeover of the health system, which includes six medical centers, a rehab hospital and a network of outpatients and surgery centers in western North Carolina.

Since the transaction, several physicians have left the health system, North Carolina Attorney General Josh Stein appointed a watchdog to monitor terms of the deal, nurses within the hospital have voted to unionize and area residents and business owners filed a putative class-action lawsuit claiming the company is abusing its monopoly power to inflate costs of care. 

Platt and Weinstein claim they were supportive — even enthusiastic — of bringing on HCA’s broader connections and hefty load of resources to the region, they wrote in the Op-Ed, but now feel their roles have been diminished and that there’s little room to contribute to the well-being of the hospital. 

“Ultimately, both of us feel generally out of the loop, powerless, voiceless and definitely unessential. At this point we are embarrassed to have been vocally supportive of the sale, to be affiliated in such a meaningless way, and to be providing whatever credibility we might have by simply being around,” they wrote. “We continue to support our local hospital as an important and vital part of our community. But we fear for its future.”

A spokesperson for HCA was unable to provide comment to the Post prior to publishing. HCA’s North Carolina division spokesperson Nancy Lindell has previously pointed to the company’s investments in the community so far, including $330 million in charity care and uninsured discounts in 2020, a new pediatric emergency room and a purchase of property that will host a 120-bed behavioral health hospital in the future.