District 63 Candidates

While the state primary election is fast approaching on Aug. 6, respective parties have more or less coalesced around their respective nominees in the race for the state House seat representing District 63.

Democratic political newcomer Elizabeth Madeira, Republican 17-year incumbent Glen Casada and Independent Williamson County Board of Education member Brad Fiscus are all vying for the same seat in the state house. 

As a means to shed further light on the three candidates, below you can find the bulk of contributions, expenditures and more. To view the financial reports themselves, click here to be directed to the state government website.

Glen Casada / Republican

Former Williamson County Commissioner, former Speaker of the state House of Representatives and 17-year incumbent Glen Casada is running as a Republican to maintain his seat representing Tennessee’s 63rd District.

Casada’s campaign fund balance as of July 27, 2020 was $368,642. Casada received a total of $6,450 in campaign contributions this election cycle, and saw $32,514 in campaign expenditures.

Contributions

Casada’s comparatively low campaign contributions are due in part to legislators not being allowed to raise money while in session.

In the later portion of 2019, Casada received $3,250 in campaign contributions, the largest being $1,500 from the Independent Medicine's PAC of Nashville.

In both the first and second quarters of 2020, Casada’s campaign did not receive any contributions due to the state House being in session for the duration of those time periods.

During the pre-primary period, which began July 1 and lasts through August 6, Casada received $3,200 in campaign contributions, the largest being $2,000 from the Jack Daniels PAC.

Casada received only two contributions from out of state; the aforementioned $2,000 from the Jack Daniels PAC out of Oakton, Va., and $250 from Norflok Southern Corp., a transportation company, out of Washington D.C.

Expenditures

In the mid-portion of 2019, Casada’s campaign saw $11,062 in expenditures, the largest being to Red Ivory Strategy of Nashville for consulting purposes.

In the later portion of 2019, Casada’s campaign saw $12,567 in expenditures, the largest being to a UPS store in the city of Hixson.

In the first quarter of 2020, Casada’s campaign saw $3,815 in expenditures, the largest being towards his former chief of staff Cade Cothren in the amount of $1,000 for web design. In a text exchange, Casada said Cothren “does a very good job” managing his campaign website.

In the second quarter of 2020, Casada’s campaign saw $4,433 in expenditures, the largest being $2,000 to Leuty CPA, a Franklin accounting firm, for professional services.

In the pre-primary period, Casada’s campaign saw $635 in expenditures, the largest being again to Cothren in the amount of $250 for web design.

Brad Fiscus / Independent

A 22-year resident of Franklin, sitting member of the Williamson County Board of Education, and former teacher, Brad Fiscus is running to represent Tennessee’s 63rd District in the state House of Representatives as an Independent.

Fiscus’ campaign fund balance as of July 28, 2020 was $7,731. Fiscus received a total of $10,998 in campaign contributions, and saw $7,169 in campaign expenditures.

Contributions

In the later portion of 2019, Fiscus received $3,797 in campaign contributions, with the largest during this time period being $500 from the COO of Wallace Goodwin, a water heater manufacturer.

In the first quarter of 2020, Fiscus received $4,113 in campaign contributions, with the largest being $1,600 from a representative of United Cancer Centers. The $1,600 contribution was also Fiscus’ only out-of-state contribution, coming from San Juan, Porto Rico.

In the second quarter of 2020, Fiscus received $3,088 in campaign contributions, with the largest being two $500 contributions from an individual in Lenoir City.

Expenditures

In the later portion of 2019, Fiscus’ campaign saw $4,669.61 in expenditures, with the largest being two $1,500 payments to Amaranth Solutions, a Franklin company, for campaign consulting services.

In the first quarter of 2020, Fiscus’ campaign saw $434.54 in expenditures, the largest being a $164.61 payment to Zoom Conferencing for subscription services.

In the second quarter of 2020, Fiscus’ campaign saw $2,065.29 in expenditures, the largest being towards Tennessee Valley Sign and Printing in the amount of $1,100.90 for campaign signs.

Elizabeth Madeira / Democratic

Former teacher, former volunteer for Pete Buttigieg’s presidential campaign and political newcomer Elizabeth Madeira is running as a Democrat to represent Tennessee’s 63rd District in the state House of Representatives.

Madeira’s campaign fund balance as of July 10, 2020 was $39,765. Madeira received a total of $50,580 in campaign contributions from 753 separate contribution, and saw $8,814 in campaign expenditures.

Contributions

The only period in which Madeira received campaign contributions was in the second quarter of 2020, in which her campaign received the aforementioned figure of $50,580. The largest single contribution was for $1,100 from a Nashville realtor on June 29.

Madeira’s campaign received 35 out-of-state contributions totaling $5,840, with the average of these out-of-state contributions being about $166. The largest of Madeira’s out-of-state contributions came from the CEO of the Illinois-based company SD Wheel, a custom wheel brand, for a total of $1,000.

Expenditures

In the second quarter of 2020, Madeira’s campaign saw $9,814 in expenditures, the largest being $5,600 towards campaign workers.

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