BGA CAE

Battle Ground Academy is hosting a panel of emerging Middle Tennessee entrepreneurs to discuss the impact of the attraction of “big technology” companies to the region and the effect it is having on Nashville’s startup ecosystem. 

The symposium, which is being conducted as part of BGA’s Entrepreneurial Leadership (EL) Program, will be held at the Sondra Morris and Robert N. Moore, Jr. ’52 Center for Arts and Entrepreneurship Wednesday from 6-7 p.m. The event is free and open to the public with registration required.

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Hallie Heiter

“As Greater Nashville continues to attract companies like Oracle, Amazon, Lyft and others, the tech landscape is changing daily,” said Hallie Heiter, director of BGA’s EL Program. “There is now a wave of smaller to mid-size tech companies like Hafta Have, VendEngine, Where and Share and Yoshi that are making significant contributions to Middle Tennessee’s business and startup momentum. 

“The symposium aims to explore the impact of big technology on Nashville’s startup ecosystem and the opportunities that this growth will provide to our students and the community at large.”

Greater Nashville Technology Council President and CEO Brian Moyer will serve as the moderator for the symposium. Panelists include Amanda Latifi, cofounder and CEO of Hafta Have; Bryan Frist, cofounder and CEO of Yoshi; Trinity Wiles, cofounder of Where and Share; and Silas Deane, founder and CEO of VendEngine.  

Launched in 2015, BGA’s Entrepreneurial Leadership program is one of the few four-year comprehensive entrepreneurship programs being offered by high schools in the country. It equips students with skills and mindsets to creatively solve real-world problems through hands-on active learning.

The event will be hosted in the theater of BGA’s Sondra Morris and Robert N. Moore Jr. ’52 Center for Arts and Entrepreneurship. In addition to a new theater and auditorium, the 44,000-square-foot facility houses the Yarbrough Family Center for Entrepreneurship, which serves as the home for the school’s EL program.

This space features four entrepreneur-focused classrooms, five breakout spaces — including one with audio/video equipment for recording presentations and vocal performances and a maker space with 3D printers, laser cutters and a host of other technologically advanced prototyping tools.